Blogmas: Santa Around the World, Part Two (10)

Wednesday, December 10, 2014


Welcome to Day 10 of Blogmas! If you want to see a running list of my Blogmas posts, you can check them out here. (:

In the U.S. we know him as "Santa Claus" but what's he called in different parts of the world? I did some research and found some pretty neat stuff. Yesterday I covered three legends, which you can check out here, and today I'll cover three more! (:

P.S.: All the stories below came from toptenz.net!

1) Tomte - Scandinavian Countries 

SOURCE

Don't be mistaken, they aren't garden gnomes! The Tomte are, however, said to be small, gnomish creatures that kept watch over family farms. Although they are generally nice, they were also known to have short fuses around those who didn't respect the farms. Over time, the Tomte became assimilated into Christmas traditions and were given more humanlike features to more closely resemble Santa.

However, the modern Tomte, still differ quite a lot from the Santa image. They don't live in the North Pole, their sleigh can't fly, and they aren't fat. Also instead of sneaking through chimneys, the parents of the children dress up like Tomte and give them their gifts in person.


2) Krampus - Austria, Germany and Hungary

Different representations of Krampus (SOURCE)

In these countries, they still have jolly old St. Nick, but with one little twist...he's accompanied by a terrifying, blood-thirsty monster called Krampus, which means "claw," in German. Basically he "takes care" of the naughty kids...and by take care I mean beats them with a birch rod, or if they're lucky, go off with just a warning. In darker versions of the story, Krampus would kidnap the naughty children, put them in a burlap sack and toss them in the river...Not really a jolly fella...


3) Ded Moroz & the Snow Maiden - Russia and other Slavic countries

One depiction of Ded Moroz and Snegurochka (SOURCE)
Let's move on to a happier picture shall we? Ded Moroz, aka "Grandfather Frost," is the Santa of Slavic countries in Eastern Europe. He looks very similar to Santa but instead of reindeer he drives a troika, or a traditional Russian horse-drawn sled. BUT, before he became the "Santa" figure he's known as today, he used to be an evil sorcerer who would kidnap kids and ask for presents as ransom. Over time, however, he reformed and started giving gifts to children to make up for his evil past.

Accompanied by his granddaughter Snegurochka, or the "Snow Maiden," Ded Moroz delivers presents on New Year's Eve or New Year's Day and leaves them under the New Year's tree. (WHEW, that was a lot of "New Years"!) In some versions he even shows up at parties and gives the gifts in person.

Hope you guys enjoyed reading these legends about different Santas around the world! Let's go on to the Holiday Comment Challenge! (-:

Holiday Comment Challenge #10: 

Out of the 6 legends, which one is your favorite/most interesting to you?


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6 comments

  1. I absolutely LOVE these posts. Such an amazing idea and very interesting. Totally up my street.

    Danielle xo

    Underland to Wonderland

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    Replies
    1. Thank you so much Danielle, means a lot especially coming from you! (:

      Lots of Love,
      Manpreet

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  2. This post was SO good and so interesting!! I love your blog post! xx

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    1. Thank you so much! :D

      Lots of Love,
      Manpreet

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  3. These were awesome legends, a little on the dark side for most but none the less awesome! I think I like the witch from last post, La Befana, its so cute that she sweeps up around the chimney before she leaves!

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    1. Yeah a lot of them were dark, which kind of doesn't surprise me. Have you heard of the original Disney fairy tales by the Grimm brothers? Those were super twisted. Lol, yeah the La Befana one was nice, and it was interesting because it was a woman! (:

      Lots of Love,
      Manpreet

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